Posts Tagged ‘Katastrophobia’

intro: 97-02-28&03-01 VV Doe-Wat dagen

‘Les Schtroumpfs Alcooliques (“the alcoholic smurfs”) had been at he V.V. already (96-02-24). Hailing from Merchtem (near Brussels): Gerd Van Hoof (bass), Mike Du Bois (drums & vocals), Raf Du Bois (guitar; R.I.P.). Somewhere in 1997 Tim Leten of Filth Ear distribution released Screams From Belgium, a 4-way split with ‘Les Schtroumpfs Alcooliques’, ‘Muggles’, ‘Hirudo’ & ‘Honey Honey’. ‘L.S.A.’ also recorded a self-titled mCD (at Midas studio 98-10-17). Later Gerd & Mike formed ‘Sunpower’.

‘Holefiller’ (also played 97-12-26) was a misanthropic bunch (from the Ghent squat-scene) playing slow, dark, doom-metal mixed with industrial parts. Sometimes they performed as a combo producing industrial noise, then they’ld call themselves ‘Hellfiller’. The core of the band was Karel Busschop (bass), David Stubbe (drums; ex ‘Neuthrone’) & ‘Leffe’ (guitar; ex ‘Chronic Disease’, ‘Private Jesus Detector’). Their mate Billy did the electronics for ‘Hellfiller’. Michael Maes recorded their demo in his attic-studio in December ‘97. Both David & Karel were in the sludge-bands ‘Thee Plague Of Gentlemen’ & ‘Möse’ later on.

‘Counter-Attack’ had played their first V.V. the year before (96-04-27) and they’ld be back (98-03-29). Originally the band was from Alken in Limburg but gradually ‘embedded’ in the anarchist/squat scene in Ghent). They played anarcho-peace-punk influenced by ‘Crass’, ‘Flux Of Pink Indians’ & ‘Dirt’. ‘Groovy’ Jochen (vocals; replaced the original female singer), Stef ‘Irritant’ Heeren (guitar/vocals), Wim ‘Simsallabim’ De Neve (bass), Jeroen (drums; later replaced by Yvan Meers who’s now in ‘Visons Of War’). Autum of 1998 they would record for their Laments And Skulls LP on Prejudice prods (JP Vandestien, Louvain-La-Neuve). The recordings for Masters And Jesters (LP out on Nabate) were done at Michaël ‘Link’ Maes’ studio in December 1999.

‘Subway Arts’ played the V.V. for the last time here after an impressive series (9212-20, 93-02-06, 93-07-04, 93-08-01, 94-04-02). Guitarist ‘Diff’ had already set up ‘Petrograd’ in October ’96 but there was an overlap with the existence of ‘Subway Arts’. Can’t remember if he played here. He’d also been here with ‘Bakunin’s Children’ about half a year before (96-07-07). Since April 1994 the others in the band were Thierry Thill (drums; replacing Claude ‘Bourano’ Bour; ex ‘Because’, also ‘Bakunin’s Children’), Fränz Laureys (bass; also in ‘D’Rotzbouwen’), Sabrina D’Aurelio (vocals; also in ‘D’Rotzbouwen’) and ‘Gull’ Alain Gouleven (guitar; ex ‘Because’, also in ‘D’Rotzbouwen’).

‘Cornucopia’ had played here on 96-02-24 for the first time and would retun a couple of times more (97-10-04 & 98-04-19). Bert Dexters (bass), Erik ‘Smerik’ Minnen (vocals), Jim Faes (who probably played the drums by then) & the (new?) guitarist Robin served the audience their frantic brand of grindcore.

‘Bullshit Propaganda’, from Hellevoetsluis (near Rotterdam, The Netherlands), were John van der Mee (bass/vocals), Niels van Beers (guitar/vocals) and Bowie de Weijer (drums/vocals). They played fast and heavy punk/crust with socio-political lyrics. They had done a demo called Belo-Fi. Later a 7” entitled Dirth World (‘97) and a split-LP with the Belgian ‘Karma’ on Tim Leten’s Filth Ear label (‘98) followed. There’s also a tape together with ‘Agathocles’) of their performance in Edegem, Belgium April 19th1997. After ‘B.P.’ split up (somewhere in ’98), Bowy teamed up with guitarist Joop ‘Jopie’ van Reede (related to ‘Die Nakse Bananen’) – who was also present here – to form the 2-piece (Mandy did ‘guest’-vocals) ‘Jesus Cröst’ (crust; they were supposed to play with ‘Doom’ but it didn’t happen…). John formed ‘Het Trio Broertje Dood’ (“furious mix of hardcore, grind and noise”) after the split. Niels became ‘Mr. Point’, guitarist/singer of ‘Low Point Drains’ (garage trashbluespunk).

‘Katastrophobia’ s first appearance at the V.V. (the second time was 98-02-13)… Some of the guys had to play twice: ‘Leffe’ (guitar; ex ‘Chronic Disease’, ‘P.J.D.’, etc.) was also in ‘Holefiller’, Stef ‘Irritant’ Heeren (drums) played also in ‘Counter-Attack’. The others were Gratiën Versypt (vocals; ex ‘4 Minute Warning’) and Nico Van Der Eeken (bass). In the summer of ’97 they would record (at Patrick Delabie’s 195 studio) their 7” (that came out on Nabate). Their next 7” (Homo Morticinus) was released by Morning Star and their LP (Age Of Aqvarius) by both labels.

Brob

Two-day fest. First day grindcore/crustcore. Second day straight-edge. First few bands on Saturday were cool. ‘Counter-Attack’ very neat. ‘Crass’-style with singer Stef. Totally my kind of thing. Then ‘Cornucopia’. ‘Smerik’ on vocals and just a bass-guitar then. We got to know Tim Leten of Filth Ear [record-label/distro] that night. He’ld become a good friend and he released some records on his label, ‘Bullshit Propaganda’ and ‘Jesus Cröst’. Also ‘Holefiller’ played. Sludge. It was quite likeable but it lasted too long for me. The venue was pretty much emptied when ‘B.P.’ played around 1.30. I sang 5 songs as guest-vocalist. We went sleeping – nackered and especially drunk – in one of the rooms upstairs with a bunch of Germans.

The next day fresh straight-edge boys. Also ‘Seein’Red’. We’d already seen them many times the last few weeks al and they made the same jokes between the songs, and we also reacted the same way. Brob was watching ‘Seein’Red’ through the window from outside… Because the distros were in the yard or he didn’t have the money to get in? I don’t know. We laughed about it.

It was a great weekend. Last time we were there.

Joop van Reede

A punk festival at the Vort’n Vis. One of our First ‘foreign’ gigs. A memroable evening, both in a positive and a way zin. In retrospect this had an influence on our attitude and view on the punk-scene, and perhaps this is also true for my later band ‘Jesus Cröst’. What left a positive impression were some of the bands that I saw for the first time that night. ‘Cornucopia’, with singer ‘Smerik’ rolling over the floor (on bare feet!), left quite an impression performance-wise. These guys became pen-pals; very nice people. Musically it was especially ‘Holefiller’ who impressed: slow, heavy music with fast eruptions. In my memory a kind of forerunner of powerviolence. It led ‘Jesus Cröst’ later to do a song called Fileholler – call it a  tribute. ‘My own band ‘B.P.’s kept being postponed; other bands kept getting priority: we finally got on stage around 3 p.m. Not very fair, being a band from The Netherlands, but we just started out and didn’t have much to demand. But because of that our show was for some 3 heavily drunk people and a dog. The audience had pretty much left or laid sloshed on the floor. I recall that most of my liking had already disappeared before we could start to play. A missed opportunity and big downer. Somewhat illustrative for the scene at that time indeed; I’ld experience it many more times later on. The lack of organisation, facilities, structure; the alcohol-abuse and the political correctness… (Our bassist got into a brawl because he ordered a beer – that was associated with being extreme-right…). ‘Bullshit Propaganda’s first and only album wasn’t entitled Don’t Support Your Local Scene [split with ‘Karma’] for nothing. And the first CD by ‘Jesus Cröst’ was – significant – entitled The Feeding Of The Party Punks. Our experiences in Ieper definitely played a role in that.

The next day there were a few Hardcore en Straight-Edge bands on the bill. Also ‘Seein’Red’ performed. Brob – who reminded us strongly of Jopie’s (guitarist van ‘Jesus Cröst’) dad – was eager to hear them play. Unfortunately he obliged himself to stay outside with his distro. We’ll never forget his face, peering through the tinu window during ‘Seein’Red’s show. Something that was discussed many a times afterwards… [Brob: By doing so I wanted to give expression to my conviction that distros should all be treated alike and that it was unfair that I had to pay entrance because I wasn’t part of the association anymore.] There was another great image on Sunday: the exodus of the punks vs. the entry of the ‘new’ audience. A bigger contrast is hardly imaginable. A stumbling procession of staggering, stinking crusties with an excess of dreads and patches, observed by a row of fresh, shaved urban hardcore dudes. Instinctively I was appreciating the second group actually more, while certainly at that time I belonged to the first. At the same time the image also represented the sectarianism of the scene. The narrow-mindedness, the uniformity and the peer-pressure. In fact nothing that you would associate with the ideals of punk (freedom, individuality), but it was there: clear and to a large extent. By the way: the ‘Seein’Red’ show was fantastic (sorry Brob!), and was marked by another funny occurrence. The guys’ talks between the songs were identical to tose we heard at a previous gig. And therefore also the shouted reactions (“Feyenoord!”).

By the way: I can’t remember if, and if so where, I slep that weekend. Probably that’s a good thing. It wouldn’t have been unworthy of man. Luckily the human mind works that way: so that on the long term only the positive things remain. For Ieper these were: the other bands, the meeting of acquaintances and the growing of new friendships. The mentioned negative things didn’t disturb me not very much back then, but would prove a cruel equation over the course of the years.

Bowie de Weijer

We had to play with ‘Holefiller’/’Helfiller’ and ‘Counter-Attack’ as for some reason or other, people tended to ask us in 3s. Some of the ‘Holefiller’/’Katastrophobia’ guys lived together at that time and Stef from ‘C.A.’ was our drummer so in a way it makes sense…I guess. Although we each had a pretty different style. We weren’t anarcho-punk and we definitely didn’t play sludge, although our sound intensified and got more heavy and more guitar-oriented over time. We had played a gig with ‘Bullshit Propaganda’ shortly before in a squat in Ghent (and I saw them for the first time in a squat in Venlo or Veldhoven, in Holland). I especially remember the gig in Ghent because the guys from ‘B.P.’ actually made quite a fuss about some packages of meat they found behind the counter (which actually turned out to be food for the dogs), which I found pretty disrespectful at the time. Not that a lot of people bothered to get their facts straight at the time…

We played pretty early on in the day because there was still light and it was in February so it must’ve been pretty early. There was quite the crowd and we played a long time (or so some people said, which isn’t quite the ‘compliment’ I expected… I mean, gigs who turn out “too long” aren’t mostly the most successful ones). We didn’t have too many songs, as we were just starting up the band but they were all pretty long for a punk-band (one song clocked at around 8 minutes, so yeah). But every crust-band wanted to be a bit like ‘Nausea’ or ‘Antisect’, plus I really like long songs and actually we initially constructed the songs around the lyrics, that’s why they mostly turned out pretty long. It became a bit of a trademark in the long run, I guess because our later songs were really long, the lyrics taking up pages and live we spun ‘em out with a lot of guitar-improvisation and noise which always was a lot of fun. We always tried to approach things a little differently and, of course, that didn’t always turn out as good as we planned. But at least we tried…

The gig felt quite comfortable, meaning I didn’t blow out my voice right away. The other bands I don’t remember clearly enough but I’m sure ‘Holefiller’/’Helfiller’ were nice, and ‘Counter-Attack’ as well. I wasn’t really into the other bands (and after their stunt at the squat in Ghent-, I tended to skip ‘Bullshit Propaganda’ a little..)…or in other bands in general. We lived in a place in Ghent where we organised gigs almost every other day and after a while I guess I had a bit of an overkill of bands repeating each other and sounding like everything else. Hope that doesn’t sound too condemning, it’s just how I felt at the time. And I always got attracted more by the art surrounding the music than the music itself, again something we tried to do with ‘Katastrophobia’, giving befriended artists the chance to get other people to know their work through us (as part of a live-gig or included in the artwork on our records,…). I still do… Don’t really recall if I stayed for the second day but I believe I did because we had our stalls from ABC and the Ghent squat-scene, and I helped out with that. All in all, there were quite a lot of people but I remember the videos and info-stands didn’t quite attract the crowd they should’ve had. I believe they were on the first floor somewhere? The videos disappointed me some, as this was the pre-DVD era: sound and image-quality weren’t always that good at the time, which had its charms of course… So, I guess that’s it, don’t remember all that much about them 2 days so I guess it must’ve been quite okay, considering…

Gratiën Versypt, vocalist of ‘Katastrophobia’

I’m not one to dwell on the past and I have to admit I hardly recall all our shows at the Vort’n Vis. I remember some moments but hardly a chronology. I think we were a 3-piece band at that particular moment. We had some technical problems due to our shitty equipment; a problem that followed us around during our short career. I don’t remember seeing much of the other bands and after all those years I don’t feel like commenting on their performance, although I remember most of them playing in squats, the Vort’n Vis and some other places during those days. ‘Cornucopia’ had a great name and a great singer; and every local hipster nowadays knows Stef from ‘Counter-Attack’ for a being a famous dark folkie. I remember the other bands by name but don’t ask for details. One is from Luxembourg, one from Belgium and there’s also a Dutch band, and they all played (fast) punk-rock: that is where my memory stops. I don’t recall the people in those bands but I have no bad memories of any of them. We played extremely slow, which was not the smartest move for a long standing career in punk-rock. We’ve met some very hostile audiences along the way but I don’t remember us caring much. Just wondering sometimes why we were such miscasts. I think we stayed in Ypres after the gig and probably got extremely drunk after the gig. A pattern that was often repeated and very common in the ‘scene’ both for audiences and bands. The extreme alcoholism in those days and in that particular crowd still strikes me to this day. I guess most of us got sober in the end and personally I pursued my career of evil in a whole different direction. Thanks for reminding me of my crusty pants days.

Karel Busschop, ‘Holefiller’ bassist

excerpts from the V.V. guestbook:

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Bullshit Propaganda

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Cornucopia

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Counter-Attack

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Holefiller

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Katastrophobia

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Les Schtroumpfs Alcooliques

VV 97-02-28 - (book C) Subway Arts

additions wellcome!…

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97-02-28&03-01 VV Doe-Wat dag

Organised by Wouter Biesemans (from Merchtem; he had put up gigs in his hometown already) who did an internschip at the Vort’n Vis during his studies social welfare.

Info by/on:

A.E.G. (anarchist economical community) was a collective of projects (connected to the Anarchist Centre in Ghent) such as the mobile kitchen Kokkerellen, the garden-group and the people’s kicthen, all working in a DIY/direct democratic manner. (Later also action-groups such as the Autonome Vluchtelingen Steungroep – autonomous refugee support-group.)

Actie Dierenbescherming – animal-protection action

Ghent squatters & Anarchist Black Cross (international network of autonomous groups supporting revolutionary prisoners)

De Nar (anarchist monthly publication)

Blokbuster (anti-racist/anti-fascist organisation)

H.L.B. (association for gay, lesbian & bisexual people) were invited but the Federatie Werkgroepen Homifilie (federation working-groups homosexuality) did a presentation

Tegenstroom (counter-current), distributors of socio-libertarian literature (later also info-, culture- & info-shop)

Zonne-Arc (non-profit organisation working around solar energy)

Esperanto

More on the bands playing on seperate days:

28 feb ’97: Subway Arts (Lux), Bullshit Propaganda (Nl), Counter-Attack (Bel), Katastrophobia (Bel), Holefiller (Bel), Les Schtroumpfs Alcooliques (Bel), Cornucopia (Bel)

[Beginning of 1996 Manu had left ‘Unhinged’ because singing made her throat worse and worse. She was replaced by Nat(halie) Linotte (vocals)… They were asked to play here but couldn’t make it.]

1 mar ’97: Seein’Red (Nl), Honey Honey (Bel), Outrage (Bel), Confrontation (Bel), Instinct (Bel), Resist The Pain (Bel)

visiters – Voice Your Opinion :-)

VV 97-03-01 - (book C) visiter Albano

VV 97-03-01 - (book C) visiter Dave

98-02-13 Insane Youth - Katastrophobia

98-02-13-dirk-time-out-benefiet-adjusted-flyer

This was a benefit for Dirk Van Alboom (guitarist of ‘Time Out’)’s wife and kid.. He died on stage of the Vort’n Vis during their gig on 97-09-19 (28 years old; °69-02-07). There was a similar event @ Sojo in Leuven on 98-03-14.

‘Katastrophobia’ (“Nihilist Punx Against Better Propsects”) were mates from the Gent squat-scene: ‘Leffe’ (guitar; ex ‘Chronic Disease’, ‘P.J.D.’), Stef ‘Irritant’ Heeren (drums; also ‘Counter-Attack), Gratiën Versypt (vocals) and Nico Van Der Eeken (bass). Leffe’ & Gratiën were also in ‘4 Minute Warning’ before. ‘Kata’ had played the V.V. before (97-02-28). In the summer of ’97 they recorded (at Patrick Delabie’s 195 studio) for a 7” that came out on Nabate. Their next 7” (Homo Morticinus) was released by Morning Star and their LP (Age Of Aqvarius) by both labels.

‘Insane Youth’, a crust-core band from Sint-Niklaas, were: Jan ‘Fons’ Wuytack (drums) [originally a guy named ‘Smet’], Tim De Baere (guitar) (briefly also Stef De Leersnijder), Thomas ‘Tomaz’ Van Rumst (bass) and Steve ‘Stiv’ Descamps (vocals). Vanessa Hoskens was the 2nd vocalist for a while. They did an auto-produced split-7″ (with the Dutch ‘Boycot’) in 1997. Nice guys with their hearts on the right place. I remember doing an interview for Profane Existence #35 with them in Tomaz’ room in Gent – great afternoon. They played the V.V. a bunch of times: 94-09-16, 94-10-22,95-09-16, 96-05-19, 97-10-28, …

‘Charlie Don’t Surf’ came from Leuven and surroundings. The band consisted of Kurt De Bont (drums), Roberto Gasparini (bass; also did some zines), Gert Goris (vocals), Kurt Van Asselberghs (guitar) and Philippe Anthonis (guitar). They played melodic HC/punk-rock. Their 7” Six Songs To Die For was released by Funtime recs, Kurt DB’s own Hageland Strikes Back and Tim Leten’s Filth-Ear distribution (in ‘98). In 1999 they did a split-CD with ‘End Of Ernie’ (on Funtime recs & Hageland Strikes Back). They played again at the Leed festival (98-09-18).

‘The End Of Ernie’ (Heist-Op-Den-Berg) play(ed) up-tempo, “in-your-face” HC/punk (Some Dutchies described them once as “Flemish frites-punk, fast, hard and not very gentle”.); the band still exists but there were quite a few line-up changes. They had a demo and besides the split-CD mentioned above (‘EO.E.’s line-up on that was: ‘Web’ & Geert – guitar, Johan – drums, Werner – bass), they also had some tracks on a split-7” with ‘D.D.I.’ & some others in 1999, and on the ALF-benefit compilation Hitters And Runners (2002). Their vocalist is Luc Ceulemans (owner of record-store Lost Culture Records).

The (garage-punk band from Aarschot) ‘Bruce’ – with Bart Jozef Robeyns (bass), Wim Asselberghs (guitar/vocals) & Peter Tielemans (drums) – released their first album The Vaticano Trail in 1997. I believe Kurt De Bont invited them because one of the other bands couldn’t make it. On the alternative flyer ‘The End Of Ernie’ is replaced by locals ‘Lifecycle’ but there’s no mentioning of them in the V.V. notes… ‘Bruce’ is still doing concerts nowadays…

Brob

‘Insane Youth’ started out in Sint-Niklaas around 1992-1993 (lo-o-ong ago) with Tomaz (bass), Tim (guitar), Smet (drums) and me (vocals); later ‘Fons’ joined on drums, learning the songs in a few sessions before doing his first gig. Then Vanessa joined briefly on vocals too and Stef on guitar (ex ’Corpus Christi’, now still ‘Visions Of War’, ‘Chaka’). He started ‘Visions Of War’ and I joined him, not leaving ‘Insane Youth’. After 7 years of touring, gigs they called it quits. Releases were the split 7” with ‘Boycot’ and a song on the compilation-LP Europe In Decline’ (Six Week recs).

Steve Descamps

Strange incidences occur and it’s always interesting to notice how different paths of people can cross and intertwine over time. It was actually quite a long time before I spoke with Dirk, although we met regularly. We were from the same area at the time (which is Lochristi, Beervelde…a region not far from Ghent where I grew up and where I “discovered” punk). We had some mutual friends and acquaintances, of course, since the scene is really small. We saw each other from time to time at the local youth-centre where I used to hang out and where they only organised stupid rock-contests for dumb, empty bands who wanted ‘to make it’. But it was a place to hang out, nevertheless; as I was too young to venture too far into the ‘big, unknown city’. So, we met and said “hello”. We kept bumping into each other from time to time and said “hello” again and time went on.

Then I was living in Ghent where we – a group of people – occupied a rather big squatted furniture-factory which had a lot of place [Brob: the Hogepont squat occupied by the Schelderatten]. We started organising gigs and such because the place was massive and open, not too far from the city-centre but nevertheless pretty isolated and because, basically, that’s what we wanted to do for a long time as we felt big, beautiful Ghent was seriously lacking a place where like-minded people could get together, organise themselves on a grass-roots level without the commercial bullshit and state-control and -interference that was going on. We tried to provide people with a place and platform to do things themselves and for others: organising gigs, performances, doing expositions of their art as a means of independent expression and non-mainstream creativity which was much-needed (then and now, of course). Also, a place to relax (as I said, we were pretty isolated, i.e. the premise was fairly big, surrounded by walls, pretty ‘green’ and somehow it breathed an atmosphere of necessary tranquillity). Every week we organised a ‘people’s kitchen’ where we (or others) made cheap, affordable meals. Over time; lotsa people started showing up so we had to move to another part of the building, which, for some reason we always overlooked but was actually fitted quite well as a (small) restaurant/concert-place for smaller gigs.

After a while, Dirk and his family started showing up. I guess he/they met some people from our squat and got invited or they visited us with some friends and decided to come back. I remember him as a really cool guy, a thing I didn’t quite expected him to be as I was pretty apprehensive about meeting people at the time. He was a little bit older than me and I regarded him as somewhat more “serious”, i.e. someone who almost found his place in life and knew what he wanted out of it. I respected that a lot and although we weren’t really into the same kind of music and learned to know him as an intelligent, caring human being. To me, definitely an asset. I wondered why we never talked before. I learned about his band, which was a different style than ours, and I remember seeing them a couple of times. I think they even played at our place [Brob: 97-09-18 ‘Time Out’ & ‘Charlie Don’t Surf’; the day before Dirk died during their gig at the V.V.]. They were fairly ‘new’ but they were making good progress and got appreciated. He told me about the gig they were doing at Vort’n Vis. I couldn’t make it the first day (I guess we had something planned at our place as well… [See above: ‘Time Out’ played…]) but I was planning on going the second day. I can’t remember who broke the news about the tragedy that happened but of course we were all shocked. Really weird when you start to think of how things went: somebody you actually ‘knew’ for some time but never had the time or the balls or the interest to actually talk to and by the time you discover how such a nice person he was, it’s over. ‘Stunned’ is a good word to describe how we all felt at the time. We all felt pretty mortal….

So we got asked to play [this benefit] with ‘Katastrophobia’ of which I don’t remember all that much. Typical…But I seem to remember that it wasn’t the average ‘all-feel-good-gig atmosphere’ and I wasn’t really in the mood either. We, as a band, weren’t exactly celebrating ‘life’ either and most of our songs and attitude was pretty negative and deconstructive (especially mine) so maybe it wasn’t such a good idea to ask us. It wàs all death and destruction at the time (hence the ‘Nihilist Punx Against Better Prospects’-slogan, which sounded cool but wasn’t maybe all too appropriate for such an occasion). Maybe it was because Dirk visited our house a lot in the end and participated quite heavily in social activities in and around Ghent, which often originated from the Ghent-based punk-scene. But I guess he always did, I just didn’t notice it before and it’s strange that you tend to remember people and how they were by the tragedies that befall them…

Gratiën V., ‘Katastrophobia’ vocalist

We still have the same line-up as back then. I remember it was a benefit was for the family of a musician that died during a cocnert. A few weeks before we had played together with ‘Charlie Don’t surf’ during a festival in Haacht organised by Kurt Debont.

‘Bruce’

excerpts from the V.V. guestbook:

VV 98-02-13 - (book C) Insane Youth

VV 98-02-13 - (book C) Spatje & Siesele

additions wellcome!…